News

UI team performs center's 5,000th organ transplant

Surgical transplant team in an operating room
Leaders of the University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics Organ Transplant Center announce that the program has performed its 5,000th solid organ transplant. This milestone was reached in March of 2015 when a patient received a new liver.

Jessica’s transplant: a story of giving and receiving

Testing for Maile and Jessica showed that the disease ravaging their kidneys was a rare genetic blood disorder known as aHUS (atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome). Only about 300 cases occur in the United States, and it’s usually seen in children. Because it’s a genetic disease, even such a rare condition as aHUS could strike twice in the same family.

Bariatric surgery success story – Tracy Schaufenbuel

Watch a video about Tracy's success with bariatric surgery.

Bariatric surgery success story – Donna Foster Paulsen

Watch a video about Donna's success with bariatric surgery.

Bariatric surgery success story - Dawn Walker

Watch and learn more about Dawn's success with bariatric surgery.

Bariatric surgery success story - Brenda Martzke

Watch and learn more about Brenda's success with bariatric surgery.

Brent Wightman's spine rehabilitation story

Brent Wightman was able to get his life back after suffering from back pain from years of hard work. All thanks to the many rehabilitative services the our hospital has to offer. He recommends the UI Hospitals & Clinics Spine Center to everyone who has chronic back pain.

ALS clinical trial gives hope to Illinois family

John Wilde from Carthage, Illinois was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, in April 2013.

Work injury recovery center helps patients and employers

“If the clinician knows your area of injury backwards and forwards, they can quickly assess what’s going on and decide whether you can get back in the game or not.”--James Nepola, MD.

Ampullary carcinoma: retiree beats lethal stomach cancer

Jim Sandegren
Jim Sandegren’s condition was a potentially fatal ampullary carcinoma. This type of cancer affects an area of the digestive system where the bile duct and pancreatic duct join and empty into the small intestine.

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