Patient Stories

Anterior approach hip surgery means less pain, quicker recovery

Joan Wuest
“The anterior approach has been around for decades, but relatively recent advances in technology, equipment, and training have made it a much more efficient and effective option for certain patients.”--Charles Clark, MD

UI Cardiovascular Genetics Program identifies cause of family’s rare form of heart disease

Terri Essary and daughter, Sheri Garmone
Heart failure specialists determined that Terri had a condition called left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC), a problem that occurs during the development of the heart.

Innovative stroke therapy provides miracle results

29-year-old Mailis Toop had a stroke in the classroom. A blood clot that had formed in a damaged artery in her neck had moved to her brain, depriving it of oxygen.

Family grateful for IVF program at UI Center for Advanced Reproductive Care

Corrine and Bill Otting enjoying family time
“Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a common cause of infertility, and many women don’t know they have PCOS until they try getting pregnant. The good news is that with the right treatment, women with PCOS can indeed get pregnant.” - Eyup Duran, MD

Spine surgery provides relief for professor with back and leg pain

Steven Clegg
“I’d be hobbling by the time I got from my lab to my car at the end of the day,” says Steven, an Iowa City resident and professor of microbiology at the University of Iowa. “And each day felt like it was getting worse.”

Minimally invasive procedure provides relief from plantar fasciitis pain

Deanna Brennan
“It was created to mimic open surgery but with less risk and less recovery time. While the procedure was initially developed for tennis elbow, we now use it for many common tendon issues, including golfer’s elbow, plantar fasciitis, and Achilles heel issues.”--Mederic Hall, MD

Innovative super-microsurgery technique treats lymphedema

Joyce Hetrick
"So many patients are suffering with lymphedema unnecessarily. Lymphedema starts out deceivingly benign and causes only minor inconveniences in life, but if you let it go untreated, it can lead to serious problems and even become life-threatening."—Wei Chen, MD

Winning with a team approach

Geri Walker
Geri Walker spent most of her career in the chaos of a school lunchroom, using her hands to prepare trays and count money. Her routine became disrupted one winter day in December 2014, when she struggled to move the fingers of her right hand.

In good hands

Linda Ayers
When severe cases of osteoarthritis in both of her thumbs made even the simplest of tasks painful, Linda took immediate action – first to see her own doctor and then to consider surgery at University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics.

Moving forward

After more than a week at the Cedar Rapids hospital, Daniel was transferred to University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics. On Dec. 16, he underwent emergency surgery - the first of four procedures over the next two weeks to remove the"dead" areas of the pancreas and drain excess fluid from his abdomen. In surgical cases like Daniel's, the development of a hernia at the site of the incision is not uncommon.

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