Special Population Screenings

  • Animal caretakers, veterinarians, vet assistants, researchers, and other workers in the Division of Animal Care:
    • Are at risk for occupational allergies, which can lead to occupational asthma. UEHC helps these workers identify the risk and protect themselves.
    • Are required by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) to undergo baseline screening to participate in the animal research program.
    • Other concerns for workers exposed to animals include:
      • Herpes B virus infection, Tuberculosis (TB), Measles, and Hepatitis A from non-human primates
      • Q-Fever from sheep
      • Toxoplasmosis from cats
    • Appropriate vaccinations to prevent spread of disease from human to animal or animal to human are assessed based on the animal exposure.
  • HAZMAT: Workers who deal with cleanup of hazardous materials need to submit a health and work history and clearance to wear SCBA.
  • Kitchen Sanitation: Employees working in areas where noise levels have been demonstrated to be equal to or exceed an 8-hour time-weighted average of 85 decibels are offered baseline and annual hearing tests.
  • Bioterrorism Lab: Special vaccinations (Meningitis, Small Pox, Q fever, Hepatitis A, and Rabies) may be administered prior to exposures. Special labs may be drawn because of different exposures in the lab, such as Tularemia, Brucella, and West Nile Virus. We also may monitor individual exposures according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention protocols.
  • Hygienic TB Mycology Lab, Office of Animal Resources, workers exposed to monkeys, and for some BSL III lab workers: Tuberculin skin testing every six months.
  • Motor pool staff travel interstate: Department of Transportation physicals.
  • Painters, welders, and solderers: Lead levels are measured and lead exposures monitored.
  • Asbestos exposure: Certain employees are screened according to OSHA standards.
  • Herpes B Simian Virus Exposure-Non-human Primate (NHP): Workers are monitored for monkey bites and scratches as well as exposure to blood or saliva. Old World monkeys (macaques, rhesus, cynomolgus and possibly others) can transmit herpes B virus SIMIAE through bites, scratches that penetrate the skin, and secretions splashed into the mucous membranes of humans. This virus, a close relative of the herpes simplex virus found in humans, is enzootic in these monkeys. The injured employee should report to their supervisor and to the veterinarian in the Office of Animal Resources. A “First Report of Injury” form should be completed.
  • Custodians, researchers, lab workers, swimming pool/whirlpool water measurers, and other personnel with human blood contacy: Hepatitis B vaccinations available.